Tropical Storms/Hurricanes

Hurriucane

 

 

 

Hurricane season is June 1 – November 30. Plan Now.

 

 

 

 

What is a hurricane?

A hurricane is a severe tropical storm that forms in the southern Atlantic Ocean, Caribbean Sea, Gulf of Mexico or eastern Pacific Ocean. To form, hurricanes need warm tropical oceans, moisture and light winds. They gather heat and energy from the warm waters.  Evaporation from seawater increases their power.

Hurricanes rotate in a counterclockwise direction around an “eye.” They have winds at least 75 mph. When they come onto land, they can bring heavy rain, strong winds and floods, and can damage buildings, trees and cars. They also produce heavy waves called storm surge.  Storm surges are very dangerous and a major reason why people must stay away from the ocean during a hurricane warning.

What is storm surge?

Hurricane Flooding – Storm Surge Map

Traffic Information

Download the Virginia  Hurricane Guide [5 mb .pdf]

know_your_zone_hurricane_public_tout

 

Know where you are. Know where to go.

Know Your Zone

 

 

Eye:  The eye is the calm center of a hurricane. Don’t be fooled if wind and rain stop during a hurricane. You may just be in the eye of the storm. Listen to the radio to find out when the storm has really passed.

FloodsMore people are killed by freshwater floods during a hurricane than by any other hazard. Never play in floodwater.

Classification:  Hurricanes are classified into five categories, based on wind speed and potential to cause damage:

  • Category One – Winds 74-95 mph
  • Category Two – Winds 96-110 mph
  • Category Three – Winds 111-129 mph
  • Category Four – Winds 130-156 mph
  • Category Five – Winds greater than 157 mph

Evacuation order:  This is the most important instruction  people affected by hurricanes will receive.  If issued, leave immediately.

Watches and Warnings

  • Hurricane/Typhoon Warning: An announcement that sustained winds of 64 knots (74 mph or 119 km/hr) or higher are expected somewhere within the specified area in association with a tropical, subtropical, or post-tropical cyclone. Because hurricane preparedness activities become difficult once winds reach tropical storm force, the warning is issued 36 hours in advance of the anticipated onset of tropical-storm-force winds (24 hours for the Western North Pacific). The warning can remain in effect when dangerously high water or a combination of dangerously high water and waves continue, even though winds may be less than hurricane force.
  • Hurricane Watch: An announcement that sustained winds of 64 knots (74 mph or 119 km/hr) or higher are possible within the specified area in association with a tropical, subtropical, or post-tropical cyclone. Because hurricane preparedness activities become difficult once winds reach tropical storm force, the hurricane watch is issued 48 hours in advance of the anticipated onset of tropical storm force winds.
  • Tropical Storm Warning: An announcement that sustained winds of 34 to 63 knots (39 to 73 mph or 63 to 118 km/hr) are expected somewhere within the specified area within 36 hours (24 hours for the Western North Pacific) in association with a tropical, subtropical, or post-tropical cyclone.
  • Tropical Storm Watch: An announcement that sustained winds of 34 to 63 knots (39 to 73 mph or 63 to 118 km/hr) are possible within the specified area within 48 hours in association with a tropical, subtropical, or post-tropical cyclone.
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